October 29th

October 29th

     “I love You Lord, my strength!” As we praise God with the words of our Responsorial Psalm, the rest of the readings serve as reminders of what it means to have the Lord God be our strength.
     The reading from the Book of Exodus commands us boldly, “You shall not molest or oppress an alien, for you were once aliens.” When we are wounded by another’s insensitivity or unreasonable behavior, God is warning us to not pass it on to others. Instead, the person of faith, will learn from the pain they experienced and share only the things that are helpful to the progress of others.
     Also, present in the first reading, are words which demonstrate God’sfavored choice to be present to the poor and needy. These words we must take seriously because they reveal the mind of God to us. The poor and needy are our responsibility.
In the Gospel, the religious leaders are still working hard to entrap Jesus. Their question was about God’s Law. Which of the 613 commandments that governed their daily lives was most important? Once again, Jesus reduces them to silence as He synthesizes all 613 commandments into two statements: “You shall love the Lord, your God, with all your heart, with all your soul and with all your mind. You shall love your neighbor as yourself. That is what the Bible is all about. That is what we mean when we pray, “I love you Lord, my strength!”

O most holy heart of Jesus, fountain of every blessing, I adore you, I love you, and with lively sorrow for my sins I offer you this poor heart of mine. Make me humble,
patient, pure and wholly obedient to your will. Grant, Good Jesus, that I may live in you and for you. Protect me in the midst of danger.
Comfort me in my afflictions. Give me health of body, assistance in my temporal needs, your blessing on all that I do, and the grace of a holy death.